A BOOKISH DISCUSSION ON MY MONTHLY FAVOURITE READS || Cam’s Bookish Tales

Although I may be generous with rating books with four or five stars, it doesn’t always mean that they are a favorite. These days I find myself loving a book but not LOVING it, you know what I mean?

So, what is the difference here? What is about a book that gets it onto my favorite shelf?

Firstly, the read humbles me. I find that a majority of a books I’m fond of tackle social issues in small or big ways. A book like The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte writes on domestic abuse in the early 1800s. The story reveals to us the strength of a mother during such a powerlessness time. A contemporary book like You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon became a favorite because it tackled a disease rarely spoken of – Huntington’s. Not only that, the author also showed us the impact of religion and culture in relation to this disease. I love books which make me realize the limitations of my experience, and also helps me understand minority groups better.

Related post: Book Review || You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon

I am one for the aesthetic; so poetic writing will always win me over. Books like The Bear and The Nightingale by Katherine Arden, and The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin are examples of this. Although the story-line for both stories are simple, the authors’ writing drew me into the world they built. They made me feel involved in the lives of the characters. It made me not only care but actually anticipate what would happen. It’s not just about writing characters who are courageous or witty; for me, I want to fall in love not just with the characters but their lives as well.

And finally, a storyline that I think on a lot. This doesn’t always have to be in a good way since crime fiction books like Ragdoll by Daniel Cole and The Child by Fiona Barton fall into my list of favourites. I think, it’s more about how these books have shocked me with their portrayal of human nature.

Related post: Book Review || The Child by Fiona Barton

And finally, there are stories that inspire me to improve my life. For example, A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard opened my eyes to how much more we needed to represent disability in books. It taught me a lot about the deaf community and how essential sign language is.

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What makes a book your favourite of the month?

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7 thoughts on “A BOOKISH DISCUSSION ON MY MONTHLY FAVOURITE READS || Cam’s Bookish Tales

  1. Marie says:

    I also find it so hard sometimes to differenciate a book I loved and a book I LOVED, haha, sometimes the difference just comes with a feeling, it’s hard to explain. I also love pretty writing, too, I really need to try The Bear & The Nightingale then 😀 x

    Liked by 1 person

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